POLITICS

Officials From the Georgia Department of Elections Provide Excuses For Residents Who Voted Illegally in the 2020 Election

While the Georgia secretary of state’s office is still looking into evidence that more than 10,300 Georgians may have voted illegally in the November 2020 election, the office’s top executive officer reportedly defended voters for breaking state election law on Friday.

When confronted with an admission from one voter that he had moved more than 30 days before the general election but cast his vote in the county where he no longer lived, Chief Operating Officer Gabriel Sterling reportedly told Atlanta’s WSB-TV, “The reality is these are normal, everyday Georgians who are just trying to exercise their right to vote in a very weird year.”

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Before Georgia validated its election results, as The Federalist reported last week, President Trump challenged the state’s tally, which showed Joe Biden winning the general election by 11,779 votes out of over five million voted. One of the more than 30 claims Trump made in his election-related lawsuit was that roughly 40,000 Georgians voted illegally in a county where they did not live.

Trump’s challenge was based on Section 21-2-218 of the state’s election code, which states unequivocally that residents must vote in the county where they live unless they moved within 30 days of the election. Georgia’s in-county voting man is so plain.

Jones also pointed out to FactCheck that 86 percent of the voters Davis recognized in person “showed up in the voting site where they were registered,” implying that they had some ties to their previous address. However, one voter, according to WSB-TV, only had to walk a few blocks to his old precinct in another county. Jones’s statement would also suggest that many of the voters on the list deliberately traveled a considerable distance to their old county of residence to vote.

In light of Sterling’s remarks, the worst spin came from Jones, who told FactCheck that “federal law demands specific inquiry” into each voter’s status, and that “labeling these people’ ‘illegal voters’ without that individualized research is a disservice.”

The secretary of state’s COO dismissed the discovery when confronted by an Atlanta investigative reporter who conducted that “individualized inquiry”—and went two-for-two with voters who admitted they had moved more than 30 days before the election. That was the real disservice!

Furthermore, while Sterling was spinning this confirmation of illegal votes as just “ordinary Georgians trying to exercise their right to vote,” the secretary of state’s press secretary pushed the contradictory talking point that in-person voters “signed an oath that they resided where they are registered,” and absentee voters “signed an application saying that they still resided where they are registered.”

So, Raffensperger, which is it? Are the 10,300+ voters who may have voted illegally in a county where they didn’t live “simply attempting to exercise their right to vote”? Or did a large number of them trick election workers by falsely signing an election petition?

Furthermore, while Sterling was spinning this confirmation of illegal votes as just “ordinary Georgians trying to exercise their right to vote,” the secretary of state’s press secretary pushed the contradictory talking point that in-person voters “signed an oath that they resided where they are registered,” and absentee voters “signed an application saying that they still resided where they are registered.”

So, Raffensperger, which is it? Are the 10,300+ voters who may have voted illegally in a county where they didn’t live “simply attempting to exercise their right to vote”? Or did a large number of them trick election workers by falsely signing an election petition?

The Federalist’s Margot Cleveland is a senior contributor. Cleveland is a former full-time faculty member and adjunct instructor at the University of Notre Dame’s College of Business, where he worked for nearly 25 years as a permanent law clerk to a federal appellate judge. Cleveland’s opinions are her own and are shared in her personal capacity.

Source
www.11alive.com www.usatoday.com www.thefederalist.com

Margaret Taylor

Experienced communications professional with 10 years of experience in international journalism.

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