POLITICS

Major Hike in Social Programs With Biden’s $1.5T Budget

President Biden unveiled a $1.5 trillion annual budget for fiscal 2022 on Friday, an increase of $118 billion over the regular 2020 appropriations and a substantial 16 percent increase in nondefense spending.

The nondefense budget of $769 billion, which includes government agencies such as transportation, health and human services, justice, and education, represents a $105.7 billion rise over the current amount.

Join The True Defender Telegram Chanel Here: https://t.me/TheTrueDefender

Officials from the administration, who claim the government has been underinvesting in domestic spending for years, pointed out that it will be approximately in line with the 30-year nondefense average of 3.3 percent of GDP.

Defense spending, which some budget watchers anticipated to remain flat in the plan, will rise by $12.3 billion, or 1.7 percent, to $753 billion, but none of that would come from the decades-old “emergency” spending bucket, which many have criticized as a budget ploy and slush fund.

The Biden plan beefs up government departments, including a 40.8 percent increase for Education, a 27.7 percent increase for Commerce, a 23.1 percent increase for Health and Human Services, and a 16 percent increase for Agriculture, in stark contrast to President Trump’s four-year budget demands, which aimed to cut funding for major agencies but were consistently rejected by Congress.

It will also give 21.3 percent to the Environmental Protection Agency and 19.8 percent to the National Science Foundation.

The defense budget, which has risen significantly under Trump, is likely to face opposition from the Democratic Party’s progressive wing, which has pressed for cuts to a bloated defense budget.

In a letter accompanying the budget request to the top appropriators in Congress, acting White House budget chief Shalanda Young wrote, “This year’s appropriations process comes at one of the most daunting times in the Nation’s history,” referring to the pandemic and its subsequent economic crises.

“This period of crisis, however, is also a time of opportunity. Together, we have the opportunity to begin building a better, safer, more stable, and more inclusive America, not only to return to the way things were before the COVID-19 pandemic and economic downturn, but to begin building a better, stronger, more secure, and more inclusive America.”

If passed, the budget would buck historical patterns by allocating more funds to non-defense services than to defense.

The White House cited proposed budget increases of $8.7 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and $10.7 billion for opioid addiction research and prevention as examples of substantial proposed spending increases in services that will make the nation healthier and more fair.


This item sells for $39.95 on Amazon. Today's special promotion is offering a massive discount on this item. President Trump 2020 Coin (Gold & Silver Plated) - Claim 1 Free OR Claim a Discount + Free Shipping This coin is a symbol of President Trump's victory and success. Get Coin HERE Or Click on the image below.

“This period of crisis, however, is also a time of opportunity. Together, we have the opportunity to begin building a better, safer, more stable, and more inclusive America, not only to return to the way things were before the COVID-19 pandemic and economic downturn, but to begin building a better, stronger, more secure, and more inclusive America.”

If passed, the budget would buck historical patterns by allocating more funds to non-defense services than to defense.

The White House cited proposed budget increases of $8.7 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and $10.7 billion for opioid addiction research and prevention as examples of substantial proposed spending increases in services that will make the nation healthier and more fair.

Republicans, whose votes are required to pass appropriations bills in the Senate, have already raised concerns about spending levels on big-ticket items like the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill and Biden’s proposed $2.3 trillion infrastructure bill, which is different from the annual spending proposed in Friday’s request.

While many budget watchers support running up record deficits to pay for trillions in COVID-19 emergency relief, they warn that deficits must be addressed in the long run.

The White House has not stated how it plans to fund the rises, which are expected to add $1.3 trillion to the deficit over the next decade.

Even the usual “skinny” budgets that administrations frequently present to begin the appropriations process fall short of Friday’s proposal.

Instead of the usual 10-year funding timeframe, it only covered the discretionary budget for 2022, with no information on tax proposals or mandatory spending initiatives like Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, which account for the majority of annual government spending. Later this spring, Biden plans to include those information in a complete, structured budget request.

Conservatives are likely to scoff at Biden’s plan to cut funding for Trump’s border wall and take back previously allocated funds, as well as his focus on the environment.

Proposals to improve gun safety and expand Title X family planning are also likely to be met with opposition from the right.

Progressives may object to the decision to increase defense spending, which administration officials claim would cover an increase in military pay. They argue that military spending is inefficient and not subject to the same scrutiny as other government spending.

Lindsay Koshgarian, program director of the left-leaning National Priorities Project, which has called for a 10% reduction in defense spending, said, “It took the Pentagon about 20 years to do a partial audit, and then they flunked it.”

“It’s not even a question of whether the money is being spent wisely; it’s a question of understanding where the money is heading, and even the Pentagon has no idea. You can imagine the backlash if that were the case with a social safety net program,” she said.

Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) lauded the substantial rise in domestic spending, which he said had fallen over the previous decade as a result of the 2011 Budget Control Act and its spending limits.

“It’s no coincidence that our country was unprepared for the COVID pandemic, and that our national stockpile of PPE [personal protective equipment] and ventilators was woefully inadequate.”

Congress regularly increased the legal caps under the law, which expires this year.

Source
www.thehill.comwww.nypost.comwww.newsbreak.com

Margaret Taylor

Experienced communications professional with 10 years of experience in international journalism.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

For continue reading on the site please disable the Ad-block